Raspberry Pi 3


Raspberry_Pi_3_Model_B

The Raspberry Pi Foundation has just sold it’s 10 millionth unit since having begun the manufacture of their original Raspberry Pi device four and a half years ago. Their original, wildly optimistic plan to reach 10,000 units at most was far surpassed soon after they shipped the first units.

The tiny computers were originally planned and designed around education – a small, affordable, easy to use computer to get children interested in technology and subsequently more deeply involved in school. Little did they know that all children, from pre-teens to old farts like me, would be attracted to its promise of a tiny world of infinite fun.

Right now I’ve got a Pi 3 dual booting OSMC and RetroPie on a 32GB micro SD card. The uses for the Pi are not yet infinite, but there are many open source projects, so many that you would need a good deal of free time to tackle them all. If you’re a part time hacker like me, you owe it to yourself to pay the $35 for a Pi and begin having fun. Hint: MicroCenter sometimes has them on sale for $29.99. 🙂

If you’re interested in the differences between the two “versions” of Raspberry Pi, below are both distributors’ boxes – RS Components/Allied Electronics and Premier Farnell/Element14. These are the two official distributors of the Pi devices. The more noticeable difference I’ve been able to surmise is that each distributor has their own box art. The other visual anomaly is on the board itself. The Alliance Technologies board reads ‘Made in UK‘ and the Element 14 reads ‘Made in PRC‘.